With the rain gone, what's next?

With the rain gone, what's next?

By; Jeff Philbin, Helicon Marketing Director

With the impact of Hurricane Irma plaguing the Tampa Bay area it is important to stay ready and alert as weather extremes such as heavy rains can lead to sinkhole development.

"Extremes of rainfall, both above and below normal, can be a factor in activating existing sinkholes. These can disrupt the water table, up or down, while also dislodging the loose material covering openings in the limestone." AccuWeather Meteorologist Jim Andrews said

 "Limestone is slightly soluble in acidic groundwater [owing to organic matter as well as acidic rainfall]. Over vast spans of time, limestone bedrock can become riddled with openings dissolved out by ground water flowing to the water table," Andrews said. "Some openings become the caves, great and small, that we are all familiar with. The groundwater carries away the dissolved calcium carbonate that is the essential mineral in limestone."

An overburden of soil and other loose material normally covers the bedrock undergoing dissolution, Andrews explained.

"Inevitably, this loose material will find its way into the bedrock openings, hiding them from sight. Once the void exceeds certain limits, a significant collapse of material into the void can happen, resulting in the surface disturbance we know as a sinkhole," Andrews said. "Over geological time, landscapes on limestone bedrock develop distinctive character shaped by dissolution and collapse. This is known as Karst; there are often pits with permanent or temporary ponds/lakes."

Warm, wet climates cause the fastest dissolution of limestone bedrock and this is where Karst, with its natural sinkholes, is best developed, Andrews said. However, Karst can even be found in deserts, where it is likely be a leftover from a “fossil” wet climate, long-ago turned dry.

Active sinkholes can be relatively small, a few feet, or they can measure many tens of feet across/deep, depending upon how big the underground void was and how much material flowed into it.

"Anything of importance above the collapse can be drawn into it. The bigger the sinkhole, the greater is the risk of property loss," Andrews said. "New sinkhole collapses usually involve existing sinkholes; these may or may not have been known to exist before collapse."

So what happens if you think your property has a sinkhole?

If you notice signs of movement in your property, and you suspect sinkhole activity, there are a series of steps you should take to determine if sinkhole activity is actually present. Remain calm. Remember, major sinkholes are extremely rare, and there are many professionals available to assist you.

Of course, if you see an actual cavity in the ground, you should take steps to make sure anyone who might come into the area stays away from the danger. You should rope off such an area completely, and if there is immediate danger to life or property, call emergency services. Contact your insurance company as well.

When you contact your insurance company, they will ask for information, and if appropriate, they will have an insurance adjustor determine if further investigation by a technical expert is warranted. If so, the insurance company will call in a certified engineer to evaluate the situation and conduct appropriate testing. The engineer will issue a report giving a detailed opinion about the cause of the damage. If there is indeed sinkhole activity, then your insurance company will come up with a repair plan.

When to bring in the best?

Helicon is the premier geotech construction company in Florida. Based out of Tampa, FL. we are a licensed general contractor leading the industry in full-service geotech construction work.

We are experts in pre-construction, soil and structural stabilization, & sinkhole repair. As the premier provider of geotech construction services throughout the state of Florida for nearly 15 years, Helicon prides itself on providing high quality service, for both insurance companies and private customers with handling all repairs and pre-construction work for both residential and commercial projects. We strive to exceed everyone’s expectations.

Helicon has successfully completed thousands of projects in the state of Florida with a focus on the Tampa Bay metropolitan area, including the surrounding counties of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando, Polk, Citrus and Marion counties. Our professional Helicon Teams are trained and equipped with the tools and expertise needed to execute a flawless and professional experience using the latest technology to repair or prevent for your particular project.

We invest in our teams ensuring they remain up to date on the latest industry technology and training. Our Office Teams will answer all your questions, provide professional service, give knowledgeable advice, and execute a project that will fully satisfy our customers.

 

Helicon is proud to support Glenn in KidVestment

This upcoming MasterChef watch party for Chef Jeff Philbin is going to be special!

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As 100% of what is raised on September 13 starting at 7:30 at Fodder & Shine will be impacting KidVestment through the support of Eckerd Kids and Friends of the Children who are working in partnership to offer a program that will impact the lives of our most vulnerable children, those in foster care.

This is a unique event as Helicon is inviting our team & families, industry friends, vendors, and alike to partake in a worthwhile event centered around a great cause for a wonderful reason.

The Friends of the Children model is dedicated to breaking the cycle of generational poverty for children at the highest risk. It focuses on the most vulnerable youth in our area, providing them a long-term paid professional mentor, or Friend, and support infrastructure to generate amazing results and transform lives. They commit to these children for 12.5 years – from kindergarten through high school – no matter what!

Helicon is a proud supporter of the program as President & Founder, Jay Silver sits on their board and believes heaviliy in his companies involvement to impact our youth here in the Tampa Bay community pledging over $10,000 per year to support a child.

This program allows kids like Glenn, with the support from his mentor, Justin Goldsmith the tools he needs to move to the fourth grade with confidence as our investment makes this progress possible.

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Justin is working hard to improve Glenn’s reading and comprehension ability. He knows this is the next step in exponential progress for Glenn and for continued academic success.

Glenn was enrolled in a summer reading program in Tampa to enhance his comprehension and reading ease. Glenn excelled every day in his classroom exercises. We are so proud that Glenn finish in the top half of his reading class and completed every chapter book that his teacher gave him. Glenn read a book each week this summer to help increase his vocabulary and reading comprehension so that he would be better prepared for the upcoming school year.

Glenn also had a lot of fun during the summer break. He got to go to the Florida Aquarium as well as attend one of the Tampa Bay Ray’s Baseball Games. Glenn also had the opportunity to meet the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston during the open training camps. Glenn is excited about being promoted to the 4th grade and could not what for the school year to start so that he can tell his friends what he did over the summer.

Because of our investment, Glenn has thrived in the Eckerd Kids | Friends of the Children program. His confidence and self-esteem has vastly improved knowing that he has friends like you and his mentor Justin by his side. Glenn has made friends with positive peers and is making better choices in his life. He is a rising star in school and he is now thinking about his future and heading toward a path to success.

Helicon is proud to support Glenn & excited to stand behind their Marketing Director Jeff Philbin who is hosting this MasterChef Watch Party to help kids just like Glenn!

Helicon | KidVestment - Chef Jeff Philbin MasterChef Watch Party

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Hello friends of Helicon

Next Wednesday, September 13 at Fodder & Shine , our Marketing Director Jeff Philbin will be hosting a MasterChef Watch Party Currently, he is Top 6 in the competition representing the City of Tampa in the hopes of becoming America’s next MasterChef.

Every Wednesday, Philbin has hosted a watch party that supports a new charity with 100% of what is raised from the sale of raffle tickets, silent auction prizes, 50/50, and general donation going to said charity to better serve out their mission.

This is 100% free event to the public but with call to action to donate to the cause.

He is not about the self-gain through this process however if he can be a vessel to support our community’s messages to drive awareness & support through these efforts, then mission accomplished and these watch parties have truly made an impact!

The next watch party will be supporting KidVestment for this particular event as our President, Jay Silver sits on the board for their program and we are making it a Helicon night for our team members and you!

We would like to extend the invitation to all our industry colleagues and friends who we have done business with to come out as well for this particular event and if any business leader or a company has any items or services they would like to donate to please contact Jeff Philbin to coordinate.

Please promote the event across your social media, conversation, and email encouraging our network of key influencers, supporters, board members, etc.. from each included to be in attendance and support.

Also, please retweet, repost, share any messaging that I will create from my channels:

Facebook 

Twitter

Instagram

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Helicon’s New Geotechnical Software Focuses on Ease of Use for Engineers

Helicon’s New Geotechnical Software Focuses on Ease of Use for Engineers

The recently launched Helical Pier Load Calculator from TMG Manufacturing is a welcomed addition to the tools engineers can use to improve their geotech construction needs. Helical Piers are an excellent choice for stabilizing existing structures that have been damage due to settlement or to prevent future settlement. Their main function is to support and stabilize the load bearing walls

Is sinkhole damage sinking Tampa Bay property values?

Is sinkhole damage sinking Tampa Bay property values?

By Susan Taylor Martin, Tampa Bay Times Senior Correspondent

On a scale of desirability, the house for sale on Whittner Drive in Land O' Lakes would rank fairly low. It's a short sale; it sits on an unstabilized sinkhole and it's within a few miles of two houses that collapsed into a gargantuan hole July 14.

The asking price is $250,000, but the seller will be lucky to get half that. As for homes much closer to the Great Pasco County Sinkhole, "I don't think anybody is going to sell anything for several months," lawyer and real estate broker David Walkowiak predicts. "To say a sinkhole negatively affects value is an understatement — it devastates the value of a house." 

Yet in Hernando County — which once had more sinkhole claims than any other place in Florida —buyers are snapping up sinkhole houses for as much as $300,000. That's because Hernando's supply of homes for sale is "so ridiculously low there are few houses to choose from if buyers want to move here," Realtor Gail Spada says. 

Along with Pinellas and Hillsborough counties, Hernando and Pasco make up a big part of Florida's notorious Sinkhole Alley. The threat of sinkhole damage haunts thousands of Tampa Bay homes, occasionally bursting into reality with disastrous results as seen this month in Pasco and in 2013 when a sinkhole opened under a Hillsborough house and swallowed a man asleep in his bedroom. 

Jeffrey Bush's body was never found. 

There is no question that sinkholes can depress property values and hurt sales although the proximity in time and place to a major sinkhole can aggravate or lessen the economic damage. It will be almost impossible to unload a home close to the Pasco sinkhole in the near future. Meanwhile, houses are selling well in Hernando, where there hasn't been a catastrophic sinkhole since one gobbled up a TV repair shop 20 years ago. 

Still, the fact that one of the destroyed Pasco homes had a supposedly repaired sinkhole is worrisome to officials throughout Tampa Bay. 

"We're certainly monitoring the situation," says Warren Weathers, Hillsborough County's chief deputy property appraiser. 

The Pasco house had been pinned — a process in which steel piers anchor the perimeter of a house to bedrock. Pinning is cheaper but considered less effective than grouting, which fills in voids beneath the house and keeps it from collapsing into the hole. 

"Pinning without addressing the subsurface with grouting is worthless," says Nicholas Albergo, a professional engineer in Tampa who serves as a court-appointed mediator in disputes over sinkhole claims. 

Pasco County Property Appraiser Gary Joiner is among those who wonder if the definition of "repaired sinkhole" needs to be revised.

"Once this is all said and done, we're going to sit down with our top staff and go over it with engineers," he says. "I'm in a sinkhole house myself — there are 32 or 33 pins — and it made me think about my own house now. I thought I was safe."

The problems with Joiner's New Port Richey home started several years ago with a small crack in the kitchen tile that eventually extended from the front to the back of the house. "You could have run a quarter all the way through it," he says. "Then we noticed the window and doors didn't open."

Because of his own experience, one the of the first things Joiner did when he became property appraiser in January was revamp the agency's web site and list all 9,291 Pasco parcels with sinkhole or subsidence activity. Home buyers can search by address, property type and area. (In Land O' Lakes, site of this month's giant sinkhole, 335 homes have shown evidence of problems.)

"We did want the public to be able, if searching for a new home, to know what they're getting into," Joiner says. "I never thought about sinkholes when buying a home but I do now. If I move again I would do my homework to make sure there's not a sinkhole." 

If you're Tampa Bay homeowner with a sinkhole, or evidence of one, your property likely will be appraised lower — good for tax purposes; perhaps not so good when it comes time to sell. 

In Pasco, Joiner's office reduces the value of homes with unrepaired sinkholes by 50 percent and those with repaired holes by about 5 percent. In Hillsborough, which has 2,100 problematic parcels, the reduction is up to 65 percent for unrepaired sinkholes and 10 percent for repaired ones. In Pinellas, with about 2,500 parcels, adjustments are on a case-by-case basis. 

Hernando, with nearly 9,000 reported sinkholes, recently had to tweak its formula.

Sale prices in the county have increased so much in the past year that even some houses with unrepaired sinkholes fetch surprising sums. Property Appraiser John Emerson's office used to reduce the value of unrepaired homes by 50 percent and repaired ones by 10 percent. 

"But based on a combination of the market getting stronger and people for whatever reason paying more for these unrepaired homes, it's now 40 percent for unrepaired and 5 percent for repaired," Emerson said. 

There is no better example of how perceptions, and values, of sinkhole homes can change than Pristine Place. 

A gated community in Hernando's Spring Hill area, Pristine Place has spacious, attractive homes susceptible to sinkholes — not the headline-grabbing monsters that devour homes but "subsidences'' that crack walls and pool decks. By 2012, nearly a third of the 673 houses in Pristine Place had documented sinkhole damage, the highest concentration in Hernando, which had the highest concentration in all of Florida.

The reason: Scores of Pristine Place homeowners had discovered it was relatively easy to get insurers to pay $100,000 or more for sinkhole repairs with no requirement that the repairs actually be made. In a rush to cash in before the law changed in 2011, many homeowners filed claims. Some made repairs. Others used the money to put in pools, send the kids to college or pay off their mortgages. 

By 2012, the lingering effects of the recession and Pristine Place's reputation as sinkhole central had driven down the median sale price to $131,000.

Fast forward to 2017. 

In the last six months, 22 homes have sold in Pristine Place. Ten of those had repaired sinkholes and sold for a median of $242,000 — $27,000 more than the median price of houses in the neighborhood without sinkholes. 

Randall Raymunt looked at 25 houses before settling on a three-bedroom, two bath sinkhole home in Pristine Place this spring. He paid the full asking price of $195,000. 

"Sinkholes are not unique. I live in Illinois and we just had a big storm come through and it caused a hole," says Raymunt, an insurance company analyst who plans to retire to Florida in a few years. "I just feel more comfortable in that the house had a sinkhole engineer and repairs that have been done."

Spada, a Spring Hill Realtor, knows that sinkholes scare off some house hunters. 

"But the majority of buyers are OK with it as long as we have access to the investigative reports as well as full documentation for the repairs or remediation," she says. "We have not run into any problems with getting insurance or having buyers move forward."

Under Florida law, a seller must tell the buyer before closing if a sinkhole claim has been made on the property and if the full amount of the proceeds was use to repair the damage. 

The Hernando property appraiser's office doesn't consider a sinkhole house "repaired" unless both the structure and the hole itself have been stabilized. In Hillsborough, where the 2013 death by sinkhole caused international shock, members of the property appraiser's staff met Thursday to discuss what happened in Land O' Lakes and whether it was an unavoidable "freak of nature" or the result of an improper repair.

One option being considered: State-hired inspectors or engineers could sample houses with repaired sinkholes to see if the work was correctly done. During the frenzy to file claims before the law tightened in 2011, numerous sinkhole repair firms sprang up, eager to share in the huge amount of money insurers were doling out. Homeowners accused some firms of sloppy work or doing no work at all.

"I would recommend that the state do (the sampling) because sinkholes are a multi-county problem," says Weathers, Hillsborough's deputy chief appraiser. "If they find out that one out of five or one out of 10 was done improperly, there is a serious problem."

While property appraisers take sinkhole activity into account in setting values, Weathers notes that the real estate market ultimately determines what homes in sinkhole-prone areas are worth.

"After about seven to 10 years, the stigma disappears if there are not any scary stories," he says. Given Florida's geology, though, there's always the potential for more calamities like those in Pasco and Hillsborough.

"If you look at a map of Spring Hill to Carrollwood, all those lakes will pop out at you — they are sinkholes," Weathers says. "Nature has made a whole swath of those beautiful lakes. There's beauty but there are also beasts."

Know the Law & Learn Your Insurance Claims

Know the Law & Learn Your Insurance Claims

By Jeff Philbin, Marketing Director, Helicon

In Florida, insurance companies are required to provide homeowners insurance coverage that includes damage from “catastrophic ground cover collapse.” They are also required to offer sinkhole damage coverage as an option, and it generally appears in a rider that comes at an additional cost. The insurance law defines catastrophic ground cover collapse in a different way than it defines a sinkhole.

Catastrophic Ground Cover Collapse

By Florida law, four conditions must be met for Florida homeowner’s insurance to cover damage (building and contents) from catastrophic ground cover collapse:

The sinking of the top layer of soil must occur abruptly. A depression in the ground cover must be clearly visible without the aid of instruments. There must be structural damage to the home, including the foundation itself. A government agency must condemn and evacuate the structure.

Settling or cracking of a structure does not automatically trigger coverage for catastrophic ground cover collapse.

Damage from a sinkhole that meets all the above conditions should be included in coverage for a catastrophic ground cover collapse. Damage from a sinkhole that does not meet the above conditions will not be covered, unless sinkhole coverage has been purchased separately.

Changes in Florida Insurance Law

In most states, coverage for home damage due to earth movement is not required. Only Tennessee and Florida require certain kinds of coverage for earth movement. Until 2007, sinkhole insurance coverage in Florida was very broad. In 2007, the Florida legislature passed Florida Statute 627.706, which requires insurance companies to provide all homeowners with coverage only for catastrophic ground cover collapse. Broader coverage for less severe damage from sinkholes was changed to an optional coverage (which would cost more).

Sinkhole claims tripled between 2007 and 2011, according to the Tampa Bay Times. There was not a clearly defined threshold for what structural damage was covered. Insurance companies faced major losses. In 2011, the legislature passed Florida Senate Bill 408, narrowing the scope of qualifying damage. Also, money paid for claims then had to be used to repair the property. Other provisions under the current law also include the following:

  • A sinkhole loss must include structural damage that includes the foundation.
  • Structural damage must involve foundation movement that exceeds an acceptable variance in the building code, and it must cause the structural systems to be unable to support the loads they were designed for.
  • There is a 2-year limit for filing sinkhole damage claims.
  • Homeowners who accept a rebate from a contractor after filing a claim risk having their sinkhole insurance voided and having to repay the rebate.

Time limits for testing by the policyholder, signing of repair contracts, and repair completion were established.

Insurance law in Florida states that a sinkhole claim must be paid only if there is structural damage that includes damage to the foundation, and it must exceed a certain variance in the building code. It must also cause the structural system to be unable to support the load or weight it was designed to support. A sinkhole claim must be filed within two years of the damage. There are other time limits on the steps of the process.

The Insurer’s Initial Responsibilities

An insurer has certain obligations to a homeowner that holds a policy and reports they may have a loss due to sinkhole activity.

  • The insurance company must inspect the premises to determine if there is structural damage that might be caused by a sinkhole.
  • If there is structural damage, the insurance company must hire and pay for a professional engineer or professional geologist to test the site and determine the cause of structural damage “within a reasonable professional probability.” If the loss is covered, the insurance company must issue a report to the homeowner.
  • The insurer must provide the homeowner with a disclosure of what caused the damage (if determined) and what circumstances require the insurance company to hire a professional to make recommendations regarding stabilizing the land and building and repairing the foundation.
  • The insurer must also disclose the homeowner’s right to request professional testing, at what points the homeowner has that right, and the circumstances when the homeowner must incur the costs for professional testing.

The Homeowner’s Right to Geological Testing

If the insurance company decides there is no loss due to a sinkhole, they may deny the claim. If the policyholder has sinkhole coverage, and the claim is denied, then the policyholder may demand testing, if they do so in writing within 60 days of the denial of the claim. In this case, the homeowner pays 50% of the lesser of the cost of the professional testing or $2,500. The insurer reimburses the homeowner if the testing shows that there is a sinkhole loss.

The Insurer’s Responsibility in the Event of a Sinkhole Loss

If a sinkhole loss is confirmed, the insurance company must notify the policyholder, stabilize land and building, and repair the foundation according to the recommendations of the professional engineer within the terms of the policy. If other repairs to the home or contents are guaranteed in the policy, they must be provided. If the recommended repairs cannot be completed within the limits of the policy, then the insurance company must complete the repairs or simply pay up to the limits of the policy.

The Responsibilities of the Homeowner

If the policyholder does not contract with a stabilization company to make the repairs recommended by the engineer, then the insurance company only has to pay for the repairs to the building and not the repairs underneath the building, such as grouting or underpinning.

Because further damage could result if stabilization and foundation repairs are not commenced quickly, the policyholder must contract for the repairs within 90 days after the loss is confirmed and the homeowner is notified. If there is a dispute, a “neutral evaluation process” could interrupt this 90 day clock.

Payment of the Sinkhole Claim

The insurance company must pay as the sinkhole stabilization and foundation repair are completed. If it’s determined in the process that the work cannot be completed within the policy limits, then the insurer must either complete the repair or pay the homeowner the amount of the policy limits without subtracting the cost of work already performed.

Timing of Soil Stabilization and Structural Repairs

The repair work must be completed within 12 months after the homeowner enters into a contract for repairs, unless the homeowner and insurer mutually agree, or if the claim is subject to some sort of dispute resolution process.

Illegality of Rebates

If the homeowner accepts a rebate from a repair company, coverage of the policy is voided, and the amount of the rebate must be paid to the insurer. If the company performing the repairs offers a rebate, it is considered insurance fraud punishable as a third degree felony. A rebate is “remuneration, payment, gift, discount, or transfer of any item of value to the policyholder “ by the repair company as “an incentive or inducement.”

Nonrenewal

If you file sinkhole claims, the insurer can only refuse to renew your homeowner’s policy if the payment of sinkhole claims equals or exceeds the limits of the policy or if you do not repair the structure according to the engineer’s recommendations.

Sinkholes: How do they form, What causes them 7 states are more prone to sinkholes, U.S. Geological Survey says

Sinkholes: How do they form, What causes them

7 states are more prone to sinkholes, U.S. Geological Survey says

Across Central Florida in past weeks, sinkholes have formed across Central Florida.

Ocala Fire Rescue officials said a sinkhole opened near a Goodwill store Sunday afternoon.

The sinkhole opened on the banks of a retention pond next to the store at the 2800 block of SW 27th Avenue, fire rescue officials said. This sinkhole opened up a quarter-mile south of where a sinkhole opened on State Road 200 near a Checker's in Ocala.

So what causes the sink hole to appear?

Florida law defines a sinkhole as a,  "landform created by subsidence of soil, sediment, or rock as underlying strata are dissolved by groundwater. A sinkhole forms by collapse into subterranean voids created by dissolution of limestone or dolostone or by subsidence as these strata are dissolved."

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, there are two types of sinkholes: dissolution, cover-subsidence sinkholes and cover-collapse sinkholes.

Dissolution sinkholes occur when limestone or dolomite are exposed to groundwater. Once the breakdown occurs, spaces and caverns can form.

Cover-subsidence sinkholes form when sediments contain sand and cover material is thicker and sediments contain more clay, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The last type of sinkholes are the most catastrophic and are called the cover-collapse sinkholes. This occurs when sediments have a large amount of clay, officials said.

Over time, surface drainage, erosion and deposition of sediment cause a sinkhole in a shallower bowl-shaped depression.

Florida, Texas, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennesseeand Pennsylvania are where sinkholes are more likely to occur, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

If you have any questions about sinkhole occurrences, The Florida Geological Survey has a database that you can look up the incidences.

Florida law, Section 627.706(2)(a) requires authorized insurers to cover catastrophic ground cover collapse. "The insurer may restrict catastrophic ground cover collapse and sinkhole loss coverage to the principal building, as defined in the applicable policy," the law states.

To read more on the Florida law, visit http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0600-0699/0627/Sections/0627.706.html

***Please note blog courtesy of www.clickorlando.com***

Helicon Recognized at Annual Safety Awards Ceremony

From left to right: Ileane J. Altamura – Vice President, Partner, Bouchard Insurance Agency, Clearwater FL, Jose Ramos – Vice President of Safety & Loss Control Services, FFVA Mutual, Insurance Company, Sylvia Kelley – Field Adjuster for FFVA Mutual Insurance Company, Christina Luecke – Senior Safety Consultant for FFVA Mutual Insurance Company, Jay Silver – President of Helicon, John Steinhour – Sinkhole Manager, Helicon, Phil Frye –Vice President of Finance & HR for Helicon

From left to right: Ileane J. Altamura – Vice President, Partner, Bouchard Insurance Agency, Clearwater FL, Jose Ramos – Vice President of Safety & Loss Control Services, FFVA Mutual, Insurance Company, Sylvia Kelley – Field Adjuster for FFVA Mutual Insurance Company, Christina Luecke – Senior Safety Consultant for FFVA Mutual Insurance Company, Jay Silver – President of Helicon, John Steinhour – Sinkhole Manager, Helicon, Phil Frye –Vice President of Finance & HR for Helicon

FFVA Mutual Insurance Company recently awarded Helicon with a highly sought after and prestigious award where annually only 10 out of 5,000 policies are recognized. The event recognized an unheard of insurance mod score of 0.69% and a loss rate of 3.8% for similar companies and over the last two and a half years, 4 managed loss time claims. 11 consultants across the Southeast from FFVA made nominations spanning the states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi, and Indiana for companies that made a real impact for having a safe environment to minimize work loss time. Helicon employees were recognized for their leadership “to run an effective safety program” said Jose Ramos, Vice President of Safety & Loss Control for FFVA by having “employee buy-in and getting everyone involved in their claims”, said Ramos.

Receiving the award for Helicon were Jay Silver, President & Founder, John Steinhour, Sinkhole Manager, and Phil Frye, Vice President of Finance & HR.

Jay Silver, President of Helicon comments, “We are proud to see our team be recognized for their attentiveness to safety. Keeping people safe is always a priority and everyone at Helicon has a role in safety; from awareness, to safety talks, to keeping an eye out.”

In addition, Ileane  Altamura , Vice President of Bouchard Insurance Agency talked about Helicon, “they never take it for granted and make the impact…they invest in safety…talk to the team everyday.”

Want to learn more?

Helicon is the premier geotech construction company in Florida. Based out of Tampa, FL. we are a licensed general contractor leading the industry in full-service geotech construction work.

We are experts in pre-construction, soil and structural stabilization, & sinkhole repair. As the premier provider of geotech construction services throughout the state of Florida for nearly 15 years, Helicon prides itself on providing high quality service, for both insurance companies and private customers with handling all repairs and pre-construction work for both residential and commercial projects. We strive to exceed everyone’s expectations.

Helicon has successfully completed thousands of projects in the state of Florida with a focus on the Tampa Bay metropolitan area, including the surrounding counties of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando, Polk, Citrus and Marion counties. Our professional Helicon Teams are trained and equipped with the tools and expertise needed to execute a flawless and professional experience using the latest technology to repair or prevent for your particular project.

We invest in our teams ensuring they remain up to date on the latest industry technology and training. Our Office Teams will answer all your questions, provide professional service, give knowledgeable advice, and execute a project that will fully satisfy our customers.

Timber Prices Continue to Rise While Steel Remains a Better Alternative

Timber Prices Continue to Rise While Steel Remains a Better Alternative

A Pre-Construction helical pier is a type of structural pier, which is installed below the structure before it is built. The steel pier is tied into the footer of the structure to keep the structure from moving due to weak or compromised soils. Normally this consists of a type of multi lead helical pier that is driven with precision deep into the ground until it rests soundly upon the underlying load-bearing strata.

Citizens delaying managed repair program rollout until 2017

Citizens delaying managed repair program rollout until 2017

Citizens Property Insurance Corp.'s Board of Governors approved hefty rate increases for 2017 on Wednesday while its president said the company plans to make its customers an offer they can't refuse.